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FreedomShot
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I for one can not wait for Windows 8. Coming from a love of all things tablet and Android I think the mix of the Windows Mobile style metro front end with a full Windows 7 esq underlying backend that you can easily switch between is a brilliant idea.

I also think that the Asus Transformer is pointing the way at how laptops are going especially in regards to Windows 8. Imagine running Windows 8 on the transformer and I think you have mobile computing nervana being able to switch from the tiled tablet style on the screen to Windows 7 style when you dock the keyboard.

Android might be great, open and versatile but it can never come close to Windows in terms of amounts of applications, games, etc.

Windows 8 in my opinion is the product that will bring most people back on the windows platform that potentially could have drifted off to nada apple land or other such weird places. I don't think they really left but the potential for Windows losing its grip looks right now in a pre-windows 8 world a real possibility.

Anyway here is an interesting article from ZDNet:

Quote:
Windows 8 tablets secret weapon: OneNote and inking
By James Kendrick | January 4, 2012, 5:20am PST

Summary: A recent incident proved to me how important OneNote and ink handling will be to Windows 8 tablets.

The Windows 8 team at Microsoft must be the busiest team in tech, with so much to do to get the OS out the door and on the slate. The company is counting on the “new” genre of tablets running Windows 8, on both Intel and ARM hardware, to bring Windows into the mobile age. While early peeks of the Metro interface with Windows 8 look promising, the devil is in the execution. I strongly urge the folks at Redmond to remember the big advantage over the competition in the tablet space, and work the pen and OneNote into the forefront of Windows 8 tablet design.

This insight came to me out of the blue when I recently received a phone call asking for my help. A former client of mine needed information about a project I handled for his company years ago, and while he figured I had no memory of the work after all this time he had to ask. Fortunately for him Microsoft and OneNote came to the rescue.

To set the stage, before changing careers to cover mobile tech full-time I was a consulting geophysicist. I managed complex 3D imaging projects for oil companies to produce accurate pictures of the earth’s subsurface. These projects would often last for months, and I usually had as many as ten of them going on concurrently.

My average day in the consulting life saw me flitting from meeting to meeting, as many as four or five a day. I used a Tablet PC extensively, taking ink notes with the pen at each meeting to help me stay on top of each project. I used OneNote for this note-taking, as all of my digital ink was searchable as soon as I wrote it down. This search capability is extremely powerful, and came into play during this client request years after the fact.

After the call from my former client I pulled out my Tablet PC that hasn’t been used much lately, and fired up OneNote. I have probably 50,000+ pages of handwritten notes taken over the years, chronicling every project I worked for clients. I did a search in OneNote for the project codename, and in just a few minutes had a hit that took me to the note with the exact answer to my client’s question.



My client was stunned that I had this information, and that I could lay my hands on it even though it was written during a meeting almost five years ago. The note page detailed the date and location of the meeting, proving the accuracy of the information.

While this is a unique situation that doesn’t happen very often, it drove home to me what Microsoft needs to do with Windows 8 on tablets. OneNote and digital ink handling are a tremendous advantage that Microsoft has over the competition, and it would be a shame to fail to capitalize on it. It may not be required by every future Windows 8 customer, but to the enterprise this could be huge.

I hope that Microsoft doesn’t forsake its legacy of the Tablet PC and includes pen/ink handling in the core of Windows 8. I hear from readers regularly wanting a good method of taking ink notes on iOS and Android tablets, and nothing comes close to the existing technology in Windows. Ink needs to be front and center in the Windows 8 tablet products.

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/mobile-news/windows-8-tablets-secret-weapon-onenote-and-inking/6285?tag=nl.e539



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Wed Jan 04, 2012 4:51 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
FreedomShot
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http://www.windows8update.com/download-windows-8-beta/

Windows 8 beta testing sign up. I am signed up.

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Sun Jan 22, 2012 12:32 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
Vizix
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seems like windows 8 is gonna be quite adapted to tablets, laptops mobile phones (which are tabs these days anyway) - i think its pretty cool but if it is actually useful for my current computer is another question, i simply don't know enough actual specifications. I am working in selling new mobile phones so this is a pretty cool time to be in it ^^
Sat Feb 18, 2012 11:11 am View user's profile Send private message
FreedomShot
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http://www.windows8update.com/download-windows-8-beta/

Customer preview is out to download and try for free. If you need a guide to installing this on a virtual machine check my Google + site on the link in my sig.

I will DL it tonight and try it out tomorrow. Really want to install this on my Asus Transformer though!

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Fri Mar 02, 2012 3:13 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
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Who is Wendy Richardson and why is she commenting on my photo? I don't even know her, the cheeky bitch.

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Fri Mar 02, 2012 6:50 pm View user's profile Send private message
FreedomShot
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The simple way to upgrade to the Windows 8 beta is simply click the link below:

http://view.atdmt.com/action/FY12_WinCon_Windows8Preview_DLButtonTag?href=http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=242045

It is the automated Microsoft version where is tells you what applications are and are not compatible then DLs the OS for you and installs it. You are free to continue using your PC whilst it DLs.

Easiest install of an OS ever. Probably because apart from the new tiles *Cough* Windows Media Centre anyone? it is based on windows 7.

I have still not done it yet but have finally clicked the above link and I have 3hr 50 mins remaining !!!

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Sun Mar 04, 2012 5:59 am View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
FreedomShot
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I am presently using Windows 8 on my main rig now and I must say I am very happy with it.

At first I could not understand why there was a desktop and a tablet like front end but now it seems to switch naturally. I guess it just takes time to get used to.

What is better about it?

It looks cool! And that is about it really! That and everything works just that little bit easier and smoother.

There was a massive "disconnect" between the tiled front screen and the traditional desktop, that is gone now. Think of the tiled desktop as your start button but converted into a screen. Think of the tiles as the icons for programmes that share the same ability as Android "apps" in that the icon for the programme also displays info from the application or programme or app or whatever we now called computer software programmes!!!

The whole keyboard and mouse thing works properly with the tiled first screen, the scroll wheel moves the screen left and right and you just click on the tile instead of pressing it (touch screen). If you get yourself a Logitech TouchPad then you can have the experience of a touch screen for 30 quid. You use the touchpad as if it was the screen, so you can swipe it etc.

I was up and running playing Eve in 15 mins including installing the OS but I did have Steam and all my steam game installed on a seperate drive and was using an SSD. All devices were understood, no driver issues.

I would give it a whirl - why not when it is free ?!

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Fri Jul 20, 2012 4:17 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
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thanks for the info mate, was very put off by the mobile phone front end, and havent really looked into it, which i should, coz its my job. i might in future

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Another article robbed off of Kotaku.com:

Quote:
Windows 8 Is Not Good For Gamers
Kate Cox
For the past several days, I've been playing with a very nice laptop that has Windows 8 Professional installed on it. Many others, like our sibling site Gizmodo, have looked at Windows 8's usability for professional environments, or for everyday home computing. I've been exploring its potential specifically for gaming, trying out play-related features both old and new. It's taken me half a week to learn to use it, but after beginning the long process of adapting, I feel that I can safely say:

Gabe Newell might be right.

Newell, head of Valve, has infamously stated that Windows 8 is "a catastrophe" for games development. Plenty of others have echoed the concerns, if in less strong language, including Blizzard, Stardock, and Markus "Notch" Persson of Minecraft fame. Valve, as a result, is hedging their bets for the future by trying to expand into Linux, and bringing more gaming there. After my frustrating days with Windows 8, that looks like a good idea.

It's not exactly that Windows 8 doesn't work. It's fast and, from my still-limited experience, stable. Programs, once open, run well. The major issues are twofold: first, Microsoft has inserted several extra steps into the process of performing basic functions like "launching a program" or "shutting down the system." Second, the parallel tracks of the "Metro" and Desktop environments give it what feels like a split personality. The overall result makes it challenging to navigate smoothly, and will likely frustrate many gamers.

Interface clunkiness, while annoying, is something a user can learn to live with. I've been navigating Windows since version 3.11 and while this feels like the clumsiest, most awkward, and least smooth iteration yet, a person who has to can adapt to almost anything. By the end of the third day, I had internalized the odd sets of mouse gestures I needed in order to get around. That workarounds are relatively simple to use and memorize doesn't make it a good idea for Windows to have ditched the basic premise of windows—panels that can be moved around and looked at and manipulated—in favor of full-screen permanence, but even if it will never be loved, at least it can be grudgingly lived with.

Windows 8 Is Not Good For Gamers The split personality, though, is a different story. The UI formerly known as Metro is the famous tablet-friendly, full-screen, color-block landing page that Windows 8 opens up to. It's quite simple to customize, once you realize that right-click is your key to getting anything done. From there, users can indeed access the more traditional desktop view with the single click of a button, but there's a catch: that "desktop" is more like an app that runs inside the Metro view, rather than an option that can be set.

A program that has been optimized for the Metro interface, like Microsoft's games store, will open in it, full-screen. A program, like Steam, designed for the Desktop environment will swap you over when you open it, even if you launch it from the Start panel. The end effect is to make the Windows 8 gaming experience the exact opposite of what Windows 7 tried to accomplish.

The Games library of 7, while imperfect, isn't a half-bad umbrella for finding everything in one place. Microsoft's stalwart Solitaire and Minesweeper are there, but so too are the icons for other games I have installed on my hard drive, from Divine Divinity to Mass Effect 3 and The Secret World. The complete division between Metro and its nested desktop environment, in Windows 8, undoes that unification and breaks games up into multiple locations once more.

But for a gamer, what really matters is this: for Metro gaming, think Xbox. For Windows gaming, think Desktop.

The Xbox Live integration into Windows 8 is at once both its best and worst feature. If you have ever seen or used the Xbox 360 Dashboard, then you know what awaits you when you select "games" from the start screen. Playing games through Microsoft's Windows store is more or less exactly like playing them on an Xbox 360. Microsoft has wanted to unify the gaming experience across their platforms, and that much, at least, they've done.

The concept of "offline" has essentially vanished from the newest version of Windows. Though you can create a Local computer profile when first setting up (which I did), Microsoft encourages you to use your Live profile instead. In other words, you log into your PC with your gamertag.

The profile I created on that PC is, functionally, no different from an Xbox Live profile. I asked a friend to add me, and when she did the popup—complete with familiar Xbox sound—showed in the upper right-hand corner of my screen while I was busy using Firefox in desktop mode. That profile shows up and works just like any other on the Xbox Live website.

The thing about the Xbox Live setup, though, is that it's designed for use primarily with a controller, and mainly from across the room. Xbox games are, by nature, full screen and don't have window functions on them. The dashboard is also very horizontally oriented. The end result? Well...

The computer I was using has a native resolution of 1600x900. A screenshot that managed to capture the entirety of Solitaire runs about 5200x900. The only way we could get it to fit in this post was to crop it to 640x3700. And turn it sideways.

Full size

That's a lot of horizontal scrolling just to see your Freecell stats.

While the loss of basic Windows menus makes games clumsy, the social integration is a big plus in Windows 8's favor, and the Xbox Live matchup feels like an idea whose time has come. It's certainly a major step forward from the execrable Games for Windows Live of the past few years. However, in so doing, Microsoft has indeed created a walled garden for PC games, and it's part of a confusing two-tiered ecosystem.

Going to "games" from the Start page takes you to the Games store. And that store, Microsoft's private playground, may well be the source of much future confusion. It feels like it's begging for cross-platform play, but in the end it serves only to muddy the waters. It's great that I can see that my friend has a beacon set for Mass Effect 3 multiplayer on her Xbox, but that does me absolutely no good if I am running the game on Windows through Origin. Rather than having a useful social connection, we're staring at each other through unbreakable glass.

Perhaps we can handwave that one away, since ME3 was released in March 2012 and Windows 8 won't be live until October. But the transition looks to be years long and, at best, confusing as hell.

As far as this version of the Windows Games Store will tell me, Left 4 Dead 2, Skyrim, and Mass Effect 3 are all games I can only play on the 360. My regular desktop, the Windows 7 one with all three of those games currently installed on it, would beg to differ. In fairness, the Windows games store is clearly in a pre-launch condition; the big-studio titles I currently play through Steam or Origin may yet appear before October.

Windows 8 Is Not Good For Gamers The list of "all apps," the way to launch programs that don't have Start or Desktop icons, highlights the messy way games get tossed around everywhere. I installed both Fable III and Portal 2 via Steam, but they don't show up in the same place. Portal 2 is considered a Steam app; Fable III, which uses Games for Windows Live and, therefore, the same gamertag as the rest, does not. Meanwhile other Microsoft apps, like Solitaire and Minesweeper, show up somewhere else entirely.

After a few days wading through the disorganization that I felt Windows 8 forced on me, I can see why developers are concerned. Yes, existing programs like Steam and Origin run perfectly well in the Desktop environment. But the way they will have to publish and develop their games, going forward, may change dramatically. The "Games" feature built into the OS is, in every way that matters, a tablet-friendly version of XBox Live.

In an ideal world, Microsoft's unified UI experience could theoretically entice more developers to make PC versions of their games when they make Xbox versions. (And in that same ideal world, they'd all be good versions, not bad ports.) But in the real world, the "walled garden" that Notch and Newell were afraid of places the same demands on a PC developer that it places on an Xbox one, and those are often a problem. The certification process for games to get on the Xbox Marketplace does not always run smoothly.

Microsoft now stands to become more of a gatekeeper for getting software on their computers than they ever have been before. Nothing will be stopping Valve, EA, Ubisoft, or any other publisher huge or indie from distributing Windows games online or on disc exactly as they have been for years. But it's easy to imagine the process going awry.
It's great that I can see that my friend has a beacon set for Mass Effect 3 multiplayer on her Xbox, but that does me absolutely no good if I am running the game on Windows through Origin. Rather than having a useful social connection, we're staring at each other through unbreakable glass.

Let's say there were a Mass Effect 4 released in 2015. Would EA then use Origin, or Windows-Xbox to connect players to it? Will the two be forced to nest together, as Games for Windows Live has been nested inside of previous games I've gotten from Steam? And of course, Valve will continue to use Steam as the publication platform for their games. So will I log into my desktop in the distant future to find that, seen one way, my computer tells me that, sorry, Left 4 Dead 3 only exists for the Xbox 720, while, seen another way, it will tell me I have the game fully patched and ready to play?

It all adds a layer of confusion that I don't think anyone particularly needs or wants. Misleading tiles and twisted ways of getting to the information the user seeks don't help anyone. Developers, publishers, and consumers alike all stand to lose out.

Not all the news is bad for Microsoft. It's easy to see a world where a Windows 8 Service Pack corrects many of these mostly surface-level issues, or a world where, like 7 to Vista, Windows 9 comes along promptly and jettisons the bad while keeping the good. The stability and underlying architecture seem to be there. But adding dozens of steps and strange layers that keep players from their games isn't going to win them any fans.

At the moment, Windows 8 is two competing operating systems that don't always play nicely together. Going to desktop in order to make programs run, and to be able to use more than one app or even more than one browser tab at a time, feels in many ways like having to boot to DOS and then launch Windows did, twenty years ago. Apps that are installed in Metro can be uninstalled with a single right-click in Metro, but don't show up in Control Panel's Programs and Features listing. Launching an app that goes to desktop mode prevents you from seeing easily if one (or two, or ten) apps are still running in the background over in Metro.

After a few years out on the market, Windows 7 works pretty well for games and gamers. Windows 8 could very well calm down and get it right after a few years, too. But will the market let it? Gaming for Mac has picked up significantly again after a couple of all but dormant decades, and Valve has plans to bring Steam, and its wealth of content, to Linux as well. Windows has remained dominant on the reach of its brand perhaps more than on the value of its product. In Windows 8, Microsoft may indeed have created a very good product for challenging Apple on their tablet turf, but while doing it they've left the door open for others to come in and reclaim the desktop space.

Windows 8 doesn't have to be a catastrophe. But as it stands, it easily could be unless Microsoft gets it together and makes the sum of its parts into a unified whole.


Original article here:-> http://kotaku.com/5936535/windows-8-is-not-good-for-gamers it [rather obviously] also has all the missing screen shots etc.

Tl;dr but I thought someone else might find it interesting. Was thinking of giving Linux another shot anyway...hurry up Gabe, we need Steam!

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Wed Aug 22, 2012 7:57 pm View user's profile Send private message
FreedomShot
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what are these guys smoking?

I have windows 8 and play every game i had on my win 7 system fine. There is simply no difference.

Steam works fine, every other programme works fine.

There is no "split personality" just a metro front end that is basically an interactive start button. It takes time to get used to but soon it feels normal. My win 7 set up feels lacking!

Hell you can even skip the metro bit and launch direct to the desktop and you can even put the start button back should you wish!!!

Try the OS out before listening to this unbalanced crap. It is very weird all this misinformation.

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Thu Aug 23, 2012 5:16 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
DodgeIt
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I've tried it and i kinda agree with these reviews

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FreedomShot
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Here is a bit of clarity as to what not being Windows 8 certified means, from an article about Notch the author of minecraft:
(http://kotaku.com/5947162/notch-id-rather-have-minecraft-not-run-on-win-8-at-all-than-to-play-along?popular=true)

"If a game is certified for Windows 8, it's able to be listed in the operating system's "Metro" interface. If it's not, it won't appear in the OS' Windows game store, but, as far as I can tell, it will still be playable on Windows 8. This doesn't seem to be a case of Notch being able to pull Minecraft from Windows 8 so much as it's a case of him not wanting to push his game into their listings and shop. It's not clear if Minecraft could be blocked from running on Windows 8, but that seems unlikely, given the OS' support for legacy applications."

The last part is the important bit. Just because a game is not on the metro part of Windows 8 doe not mean it will not work. The OS is the best yet at emulating previous versions of Windows. I have gotten all my Win XP games to work on it by simply right clicking and selecting compatibility mode. Simple and easy.

So this whole Win 8 ruining PC gaming really is trash talk with no substance.

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Sat Sep 29, 2012 12:31 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger ICQ Number
Carter
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But once it's in, it doesn't stop them going further in that direction.

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Sat Sep 29, 2012 2:00 pm View user's profile Send private message
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Here is the CNet review:

http://reviews.cnet.com/windows-8-review/

I pretty much agree with what is said there. Like it or lump it if you are into mobile computing Windows 8 is about to change everything. The new market that apple opened up with the iPad and Google dominated with Android is soon to be taken back into the Microsoft fold. The question will be asked - an iPad or a fully functioning PC? No contest for anyone with a brain. It is nice to see the Asus Transformer being ripped off by all the tech companies as they merge tablet computing with laptops.

I now bet that apple follow this with some animal named tablet / keyboard hybrid. How could they not.

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I don't want all those ghey coloured things on my desktop, that'll do my head in, it's way too busy. As soon as Win7 goes out the door, I think it's going to have to be Linux for me.

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